INDIA satanica: without freedom of religion

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  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    10/10/2012 [ INDIA satanica: without freedom of religion? You definitely come down in the sewer! ] Corruption, anti-politics and cynical use of religion threaten India and democracy by Giulia Mazza. AsiaNews interviews Gyan Prakash, an Indian historian who teaches at Princeton University. Starting from his latest book, which is about Mumbai, the scholar looks at today's India, pushed towards the future but also victim of corruption and anti-politics. Religion is a source of harmony and coexistence. Do spirituality and religion still matter in India? Where does the violence that often sees Christians and other minorities victimised by Hindu nationalists come from?
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    19 secondi fa
    [ INDIA satanica: without freedom of religion? You definitely come down in the sewer! ] The massacres in Gujarat and the pogroms in Orissa are the most visible examples. The problem in Gujarat is that a whole state mechanism had developed to help Hindu communal forces. That is very, very dangerous. We saw the result of this in 2002 and subsequently.Minorities in Gujarat feel completely as second class citizens. They do not have full rights and are constantly under suspicion as foreign agents of Pakistan. This explains why there have been concerted attacks against Muslims. I would say that Gujarat is the main place. It is strange that Narendra Modi still has great support and could even run in the next elections on an anti-minority platform and be democratically elected. This is a very dangerous situation.
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    29 secondi fa
    [ INDIA satanica: without freedom of religion? You definitely come down in the sewer! ] People say that religion can be used to promote the values of harmony and coexistence. Actually, most people who are religious are not concerned with communal violence. It is people who are politically inclined and want more power who use religion. So the problem is not religion as faith, but religion as a tool of power. It is a very cynical, very instrumental way to use religion, which has nothing to do with faith, worship or theological matters. It has only to do with identity. And that's what BJP has used to stay in power.
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    7 minuti fa
    666 Darvicus employee of synnek1 cannibal--- which prejudice? if your skeleton is too rotten, even when he took a shower?
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    10 minuti fa
    SCO [we have to divide: the countries in monetary sovereignty, from those of the Pharisees shit the IMF 666: Russia quit the IMF] CHINA - JAPAN - IMF: Islands not only reason for China IMF snub. Beijing is showing its irritation over the fact that it is not included in a basket of currencies used in world economic transactions. Tokyo (AsiaNews) - The Governor of China's central bank Zhou Xiaochuan has decided not to attend a meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) scheduled for this week in Tokyo. The row between China and Japan over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea is ostensibly the main reason. "We were informed two days ago that Governor Zhou's schedule might require him to cancel his lecture in Tokyo," an IMF spokeswoman said.
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    SCO [we have to divide: the countries in monetary sovereignty, from those of the Pharisees shit the IMF 666: Russia quit the IMF] CHINA - JAPAN - IMF: "It has now been confirmed that his deputy Yi Gang will represent him." Zhou had been set to deliver a closing keynote lecture on Sunday. In the weeks leading up to the summit, Japanese authorities tried to be reassuring about the presence of top Chinese officials in Tokyo even though CEOs of Chinese private banks had decided to scale down (or even cancel) their participation. Japan's reaction was swift. "If he [Zhou] is not coming, it is regrettable that a representative of the Chinese authorities does not participate in this important international meeting in Tokyo. At all events, Japan-China economic relationship is very important and Japan will continue to communicate with China from a broader standpoint," a Japanese government official said.
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    10 minuti fa
    SCO [we have to divide: the countries in monetary sovereignty, from those of the Pharisees shit the IMF 666: Russia quit the IMF] CHINA - JAPAN - IMF: The group of islands in the East China Sea is at the centre of the row between the two countries. Since August, Tokyo and Beijing have upped the ante over who owns the islands, even though it is unclear how valuable they are. As for the IMF summit, some analysts believe the islands are the "perfect excuse" for China to skip the summit because of the international organisation's opposition to the inclusion of the yuan in the basket of currencies used in international economic transactions. Beijing would like to see its currency replace the dollar, but since it directly controls the yuan's value independently of the IMF, its aim is not likely to be satisfied.
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    UniusRei Terminate with extreme prejudice.
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    WHAT A FAG V
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    [ SCO CHINA: not deteriorate too my work unius REI ] Jiangsu, an 80 year old spends 4 years in prison without any criminal conviction. The provincial authorities arrested Chen Yudao in 2008 over the murder of a neighbor. Without evidence, witnesses or motivation they kept him one year in prison, three years ago at the trial the judges did not sentence him. The abuses of the new Code of Criminal Procedure, which allows the police to do what it wants. Nanjing (AsiaNews) - Without any criminal conviction, the authorities in the eastern province of Jiangsu continue to keep an 80 year-old man they arrested four years ago in prison. He was tried three years ago (after more than 1 year in "preventive" prison) for murder: Despite pressure from the police, however, the judges did not issue any sentence. The case is reported by the Chinese Human Rights Defenders.
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    25 minuti fa
    [ SCO CHINA: not deteriorate too my work unius REI ] In May 2008, the Nantong police arrested Chen Yudao over the murder of a neighbor. For a week they questioned him relentlessly and without warning the family, as required by law. However, the man resisted pressure and torture, which he later denounced at the district court. According to his son, the police tried to "solve" the case with a confession, failing to get this they attempted to convince people to present themselves as "witnesses" and brought false evidence before the judges. All this to get a promotion promised by their superiors. After more than one year of continuous abuse, the police presented the case to the courts.
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    25 minuti fa
    [ SCO CHINA: not deteriorate too my work unius REI ] Today, after three years, the court has not yet issued a final judgment notwithstanding Article 168 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, which requires the court to rule more than two and a half months after the initiation of the proceeding. This is a clear case of abuse of office: in December 2011 a new and controversial Code of Criminal Procedure was issued in China which grants police freedom to practically do anything they want. The text will be examined and approved by the next Communist Party Congress, scheduled for November 8, but in the meantime it is already in force.
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    37 minuti fa
    ola tengo los mejores videos ven a verlos te gustaran
  • JewsxMessiahUniusRei
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    1 ora fa
    [] allarm [] are the [big] bankers: enlightened of IMF-NWO & seigniorage banking, who should be investigated and arrested: Globalist and Their friends, like George Soros. You hit the snake to his little head? then all his big & long body of political puppets: they will all be freed from Their control. quickly, I'll sit on my throne in Jerusalem! in fact: all people Will Understand, That We are on the edge of a cliff! [♰ ★] "amen" was said: in Jesus's name. I has done wrong to the All Those criminals who toppled the cross [ MENE Techel PERES] CSP BCSSMLN DSMD VRSNSMVS MQLIVB "Drink your poisons made ​​by yourself." You are all lost! "Luke19.27; ★ by Rei Unius ♰ King ♥: Israel: ♥ Mahdi


10/10/2012 13:39
INDIA
India e democrazia, minacciate da corruzione, antipolitica e uso cinico della religione
di Giulia Mazza
AsiaNews intervista Gyan Prakash, storico indiano che insegna all’università di Princeton. Partendo dal suo ultimo libro, dedicato alla città di Mumbai, il professore traccia un quadro dell’India di oggi, proiettata verso il futuro, ma vittima di corruzione e sentimenti antipolitici. La religione come fonte di armonia e coesistenza.


Roma (AsiaNews) - È in corso a Roma in questi giorni la XIII edizione di "Asiatica, Incontri con il cinema asiatico", rassegna che presenta gli ultimi lavori provenienti dal Medio ed Estremo oriente. Ieri Gyan Prakash, docente di storia all'università di Princeton, ha presentato il suo ultimo libro, dal titolo "La città color zafferano. Bombay tra metropoli e mito". Un viaggio attraverso il volto più cosmopolita della capitale del Maharashtra, vera e propria metropoli ante-litteram, dove le diversità linguistiche, culturali e religiose dei suoi abitanti sono state (e sono tuttora) forza e punto debole. AsiaNews ha incontrato l'autore, che ha offerto il suo punto di vista sull'India di oggi: un Paese ancora diviso tra modernità e tradizione, dove le giuste lotte contro la corruzione rischiano di alimentare un sentimento di antipolitica "molto pericoloso" per la democrazia. In questo quadro, s'inseriscono gli episodi di violenza perpetrati dai nazionalisti indù contro le minoranze, in particolare cristiana e musulmana. Esse, spiega, non hanno a che vedere con la fede, ma dimostrano "un uso cinico, meschino e strumentale" della religione per "ottenere potere".
È corretto prendere Mumbai, con la sua storia ed evoluzione, a macro-modello della società indiana attuale?
Mumbai è un modello per la moderna società indiana: non la si può considerare tale prendendo l'intero contesto storico del Paese, ma il modo in cui l'India si è sviluppata. Penso alla grande diversità che contraddistingue Mumbai: con le sue molteplici comunità religiose, la sua grande varietà linguistica, essa crea e rappresenta una sorta di museo sulla cultura e la religione indiana. È importante anche il modo in cui Mumbai ha affrontato i problemi derivanti da queste differenze religiose e culturali. In tal senso, Mumbai rispecchia l'India nella sua interezza, ma in un modo del tutto particolare. Per lungo tempo, essa è stata una città cosmopolita, dove persone provenienti da contesti diversi vivevano insieme. Dopo il 1992-1993 [quando è stata teatro di violenti scontri etnico-religiosi tra indù e musulmani, ndr], Mumbai è stata sotto pressione, ma l'idea di una società moderna capace di accogliere comunità differenti tra loro è diventata ed è ancora oggi una sfida per Mumbai e per l'India.
L'India sembra sempre divisa tra spinta alla modernità e rispetto degli antichi valori. Eppure, i tentativi di apertura vengono contrastati. Crede che il Paese potrà mai assumere un volto "globale", scevro da luoghi comuni, ma al tempo stesso in equilibrio con la propria cultura?
Per l'India riuscire a convogliare le proprie tradizioni con lo sviluppo moderno è una sfida da sempre. Tra il 19mo e il 20mo secolo la gente ha cercato di creare un sistema in cui le nuove sensibilità attingessero ai valori tradizionali, e viceversa. Per questo, credo che questa contaminazione sia un cammino molto vivo per l'India. Oggi, la sfida con la globalizzazione pone un diverso tipo di interscambio tra esterno e interno. C'è il tentativo di creare un volto omogeneo, che sia lo stesso in tutto il mondo: pensiamo ai cafè, ai supermercati, ai centri commerciali. Gli indiani resistono a questo tipo di globalizzazione. Di recente, per esempio, vi è stato l'annuncio dell'arrivo di Wallmart e Carrefour [grandi catene internazionali di supermercati, ndr]: secondo la popolazione, l'entrata di questi enormi conglomerati distruggerà molti dei tipici negozietti locali, che fanno parte della vita e della quotidianità dell'India. Non è solo una questione "economica", e non riguarda l'essere contrari alla globalizzazione, perché in qualche modo la gente dovrà venire a patti anche con questa realtà. Ma quando essa diventa del tutto dominante, e si ha la sensazione di assistere a una sorta di inculturazione, allora la gente reagisce.
L'attuale classe politica appare impantanata negli scandali legati alla corruzione, quasi incapace di proiettare l'India in una nuova fase. Che prospettive ha la politica indiana?
La corruzione è una questione importante, e molte persone sono scese in piazza per protestare contro di essa. Il problema ora è che il movimento anti-corruzione sta portando alla creazione di un movimento anti-politico, in cui non è più sotto attacco solo la corruzione, ma le stesse istituzioni. Questo è molto pericoloso, perché significa che le persone, invece di una democrazia, sono alla ricerca di una tecnocrazia, che ripulisca tutto e gestisca il Paese in modo più efficiente e responsabile. Per quanto mi riguarda, non credo che questa sia la risposta. Con l'esplosione di tutti questi scandali, il movimento anti-corruzione ha creato una sorta di consapevolezza, nel tentativo di rendere i politici e la politica più responsabili. Questa è una cosa buona. Ma quello che Anna Hazare e Baba Ramdev ["guru" e leader dell'anti-corruzione, ndr] hanno fatto è molto, molto pericoloso. E non sorprende che l'attacco alla politica avvenga proprio quando la democrazia è diventata più diffusa, la gente parla più dialetti e tribali e membri di caste inferiori sono entrati in politica. È interessante notare che prima, quando in politica vi erano solo membri di caste superiori - ma ugualmente corrotti -, non esistevano movimenti simili. Quando il governo ha accolto anche altre persone, ecco che si è creato questo sentimento di anti-politica. Questo è l'elemento antidemocratico. Il nostro establishment non riuscirà a liberarsi di questo problema da solo, ma è probabile che la grande attenzione dei media a questi scandali costringerà la classe politica a rivedere il proprio comportamento. E se le persone mantengono la loro fiducia nelle istituzioni politiche, allora il problema può davvero essere risolto attraverso un processo democratico.
Spiritualità e religione hanno ancora un valore in India? E da cosa nascono le violenze che spesso vedono cristiani e minoranze vittime dei nazionalisti indù?
I massacri del Gujarat e i pogrom dell'Orissa sono gli esempi più eclatanti. Il problema in Gujarat è che si è creato un vero e proprio meccanismo di Stato, che aiuta e sostiene i nazionalisti indù. Questo è molto, molto pericoloso, e i risultati si vedono ancora oggi. In Gujarat le minoranze si sentono cittadini di seconda classe, non godono di pieni diritti e vivono come fossero sospettati di essere agenti infiltrati dal Pakistan. Narendra Modi [chief minister dello Stato, ritenuto responsabile dei massacri del 2002 dalle vittime, ndr] continua ad avere un forte sostegno: dopo le stragi è stato rieletto capo del governo, e potrebbe correre alle prossime elezioni generali (2014) per il posto di primo ministro. Egli presenta lo Stato come modello di sviluppo, ma al tempo stesso continua a esprimere la propria opposizione alle minoranze. È una combinazione molto tossica.
Dalla religione, la gente trae valori come l'armonia e la coesistenza pacifica, e la maggior parte non ha nulla a che vedere con queste violenze. Quanti sono invischiati con la politica e desiderano maggiore potere, sfruttano la religione a loro vantaggio. Così, non è più la religione come fede, ma come strumento per ottenere potere. È un uso della religione meschino, molto cinico, che non ha nulla a che fare col credere, con il praticare la propria fede, con questioni di tipo teologico. È solo una questione di identità, ed è quello che il Bharatiya Janata Party (Bjp, partito ultranazionalista indù che sostiene movimenti violenti) usa per restare al potere.



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10/10/2012 17:46
INDIA
Corruption, anti-politics and cynical use of religion threaten India and democracy
by Giulia Mazza
AsiaNews interviews Gyan Prakash, an Indian historian who teaches at Princeton University. Starting from his latest book, which is about Mumbai, the scholar looks at today's India, pushed towards the future but also victim of corruption and anti-politics. Religion is a source of harmony and coexistence.


Rome (AsiaNews) - Rome is currently hosting the 13th edition of Asiatica - Encounters with Asian Cinema, a festival dedicated to films from the Middle East and the Far East. Yesterday, Gyan Prakash, a professor of history at Princeton University, presented La città color zafferano. Bombay tra metropoli e mito, the Italian edition of his latest work, Mumbai Fables, a plunge in the cosmopolitan character of Maharashtra's capital city, a metropolis before any existed where its people's linguistic, cultural and religious differences were (and still are) its strength and weakness.
AsiaNews met the scholar who spoke about today's India, a country divided between modernity and tradition, where a just struggle against corruption is in danger of feeding a form of anti-politics that could prove dangerous to democracy.
Violence by Hindu nationalists against minorities, especially Christians and Muslims, is part of this danger. For the historian, violence has nothing to do with faith but is evidence of "a very cynical, very instrumental use of religion" to grab power.
Is it appropriate to use Mumbai, its history and evolution, as a model for today's Indian society?
It is a model of modern India society. You cannot take it in the context of India's long history, but in the way which modern India developed. So the couple of examples I have in mind can illustrate Mumbai's diversity, with its many religious and linguistic communities. This creates or represents a kind of museum of Indian culture and religion, of India as a whole. And the way in which Mumbai has dealt with this issue of religious and culture difference is, to some extent, reflective at India as a whole, but in a very particular way. You know, for a long time Mumbai was a cosmopolitan city where people of different backgrounds lived together. Since 1992-1993, the cosmopolitan city has been under pressure, but the idea of a modern society with different communities living together is a challenge both for India and Mumbai.
India seems divided between a push towards modernity and respect for ancient values. However, attempts at openness have been resisted. Do you believe it can take a "global" character, free from clichés, but one that is balance with its own culture?
It is true that India is a kind of modern development, a challenge as to what to do with inheritance, tradition, religion and so on. In the 19th and 20th century people managed to create a way in which their modern sensibilities were either informed by certain traditional values or were modernized. I think India has followed this path for centuries. The present challenge with globalization is a different, a mixture of outside and inside factors. In the sense, globalization leads to a certain homogenisation all over the world like the same cafè or supermarket. This kind of globalization is resisted by people. So, for example, the arrival of Walmart and Carrefour has led people to argue that the entry of these huge conglomerates will actually kill many local shops and vendors, which are part of everyday life in Mumbai and India. It is not just a question of buying things, but also the creation of a certain kind of relationship. It is not against globalization. In some ways, people have to work with elements of globalization. But when that becomes completely dominant, there is resistance. I mean, all of us, as long as the things are done on our term, it is ok, but when there is an attempt to impose things, we see a sort of enculturation.
The existing political class appears caught up in corruption-related scandals, almost incapable of leading India into its next phase. What is the future of Indian politics?
Corruption is a major issue and a lot of people have been on the streets to protest against it. The issue right now is that the anti-corruption movement has also led to almost an anti-political movement, where it is not just corruption that is under attack but also politics. That is dangerous. It is no good. Because it means that instead of democracy, people are looking for certain people.  They want some kind of technocracy, which will clean up everything, and manage India in a much more efficient, clean and accountable way. But I don't think that is the answer.
What the anti-corruption movement has done is to create a sort of awareness about all these scandals. There is an attempt to make politicians and politics more accountable. And that, I think, is a good thing. But what Anna Hazare and Baba Ramdev have done is very, very dangerous, anti-political. It is not surprising that the attack on politics comes precisely at a time when democracy has also become more generalized with more local people into politics.
It is interesting that in the past, when upper caste politicians were corrupt, you did not have this movement. It is when the people get into politics that the movement against politics develops. That is the antidemocratic element. I think they have to do what the political establishment will not do it on its own. The movement and media exposure will probably force politicians not to be so obligingly corrupt and anti-people as they are. You know, recently we had a coal scandal. Before that, we had telecom scandal. So I hope that this will force politicians to be more accountable. If people retain their faith in political institutions, they can work to expand political institutions. Then I think this issue can be dealt with through the democratic process.
Do spirituality and religion still matter in India? Where does the violence that often sees Christians and other minorities victimised by Hindu nationalists come from?
The massacres in Gujarat and the pogroms in Orissa are the most visible examples. The problem in Gujarat is that a whole state mechanism had developed to help Hindu communal forces. That is very, very dangerous. We saw the result of this in 2002 and subsequently.
Minorities in Gujarat feel completely as second class citizens. They do not have full rights and are constantly under suspicion as foreign agents of Pakistan. This explains why there have been concerted attacks against Muslims. I would say that Gujarat is the main place. It is strange that Narendra Modi still has great support and could even run in the next elections on an anti-minority platform and be democratically elected. This is a very dangerous situation.
People say that religion can be used to promote the values of harmony and coexistence. Actually, most people who are religious are not concerned with communal violence. It is people who are politically inclined and want more power who use religion. So the problem is not religion as faith, but religion as a tool of power. It is a very cynical, very instrumental way to use religion, which has nothing to do with faith, worship or theological matters. It has only to do with identity. And that's what BJP has used to stay in power.


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